Ripple-effect across the US from Greater Copenhagen visit

What happens when 28 leaders from 13 American cities visit Malmö and Copenhagen for a week? Aside from jumping in the Copenhagen harbor bath, they start applying fresh ideas on green growth and urban design in their respective home cities just four months later.

When US city leaders are challenged to reexamine their own ideas and notions of what they thought possible in their home cities, it takes a comprehensive and action-packed delegation program to match such a challenge. One-Point Entry came up with just that, and only four months after the visit, the ripple-effects are felt in cities from California to North Carolina and Florida.

The program included site visits and tours, guided by the likes of Rambøll and Gehl Architects, to see examples of innovative urban design such as The Bicycle Snake and Israels Plads – the former a clever piece of bicycle infrastructure and the latter a combined public space and cloudburst mitigation system.


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"Our city delegates left Copenhagen inspired and have since been applying the learnings and ideas in their respective cities across the US."

Rossana Tudo, organizer of the US cities delegation

In Tallahassee, Florida, for example, the principal City planners have incorporated left turn boxes, a standard in Copenhagen, into the design of the city’s first ever protected bike lane. Generally, infrastructure and providing transportation choices that benefits pedestrians and cyclists as well are recurring themes of inspiration among the city delegates. Furthermore, the visit has generated a significant amount of media coverage which may well inspire future visits to Greater Copenhagen.


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"Since the visit, the word about Danish solutions for urban liveability has been spread through local media from Georgia to North Dakota."

Rossana Tudo, organizer of the US cities delegation